comixology
comixology:

comiXology Unbound's #LongReads↳Black is the Color by Julia Gfrörer (doopliss)

A 17th century sailor is abandoned at sea by his shipmates, enduring both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. A delicately drawn, lyrical and darkly romantic debut graphic novella.

Julia Gfrörer’s art is all at once creepily haunting and hypnotically beautiful and perfectly fitting for this tale of a soul lost at sea. 
[Dive into Black is the Color here]
#LongReads: Every Thursday Afternoon comiXology Unbound suggests a comic to read for those who are looking for something more than 22 pages!

It’s not *that* long really.

comixology:

comiXology Unbound's #LongReads
Black is the Color by Julia Gfrörer (doopliss)

A 17th century sailor is abandoned at sea by his shipmates, enduring both his lingering death sentence and the advances of a cruel and amorous mermaid. A delicately drawn, lyrical and darkly romantic debut graphic novella.

Julia Gfrörer’s art is all at once creepily haunting and hypnotically beautiful and perfectly fitting for this tale of a soul lost at sea. 

[Dive into Black is the Color here]


#LongReads: Every Thursday Afternoon comiXology Unbound suggests a comic to read for those who are looking for something more than 22 pages!

It’s not *that* long really.

Janet Hamlin:

Finished for now in Guantanamo at 9/11 pretrial hearings. As seen, Military Commissions judge Army Col. Pohl announces decision to hold proceedings until an FBI breach is investigated and resolved. Prior to hearing, KSM conferred with defense. BW sketches show Brg. Gen. Mark Martins at a press conference, and in final sketch we see victim family members watch the defense give statements from the media press room.

dashshaw

dashshaw:

This mini, Family Feud, 2012, was initially inspired by something I read Art Spiegelman say in an interview. By the time I drew it, I’d forgot exactly what he said. I remembered it differently. I was thinking about it again recently and I found it online. He said:

Well, it’s not just in Family Feud where you’re rewarded for knowing what people know. In life, you have to know what people expect you to know. Otherwise, you end up in the nut house. Now, it’s easy, because I’ve had practice at it. But, when I was twenty, I’d had no practice whatsoever. I wasn’t aware of the conventions, and that was a problem.

Possibly it’s in a different interview, but I misremembered it as being something like: “If the Family Feud prompt is ‘objects in your fridge’, you might have batteries in your refrigerator, but you have to say ‘milk’ because that’s going to be the ‘correct’ answer. In life, in order to fit in, you have to learn to provide the most common answer, not the answer that is true to you.

Dash Shaw